Monday, January 18, 2010

Interview at Examiner.com

Click here to read Exclusive Assassination: Julia Oldham. This is an interview with me on Examiner.com by Salt Lake City-based conceptual artist Qi Peng, who has been working on an ongoing series of artist interview portraits that he calls "artist assassinations". We worked on the interview together during the summer, so some of my answers are based on what was going on around July/August 2009.

9 comments:

  1. Yes, microcosmos was a good movie. We even have the book for it.

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  2. Ooh, I didn't know there was a book!

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  3. Nuridsany & Perennou, Microcosmos (1997).
    Great pictures with text. At the end there are 6 pages where they explain how they did the filming.

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  4. Nice interview Julia...although the term "assassination" is a bit of a head scratcher. You mention that you have a day job...is it art related?

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  5. Thanks, Aydin, for the book info! And Albertus, I make science videos for a national science laboratory in MD (NIST) as my day job. I mostly work from home, but take field trips down to the lab for shoots. Right now I'm working on a video about the Quantum Watt project that is taking place in the metrology department. It's fun! (Haha, agreed about the "assassination".)

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  6. Aha! So your day job does feed into your art. That's very interesting and cool. I have a day job as well. I direct a gallery/studio for adults with developmental disabilities. And, I write a blog for them as well...here's that link if interested: http://studio633.wordpress.com/ Al

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  7. Thanks so much for the link. What a wonderful project. I love the double portrait painted by a woman named Julie, in which she gave one of the subjects a wrench! Really great!

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  8. Julie is amazing and has such a need to know how things work. She has made many life-sized portraits of friends and family from gauze, thriftstore clothes and wigs. Each is made from the inside out starting with a skeletal system...then veins, nerves, etc...until the person is made. She makes these privately, and are not for public view. Julie also loves usb cables, fuses, transistors, gears, cogs, and tools.

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  9. Wow--how interesting! It sounds like you work with some really cool folks and get to see some pretty incredible artmaking processes.

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